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Old Town Locations - Third on the Match


Old Town is the oldest neighbourhood of Easthaven, the original city. While the buildings are old, only a few notable buildings predate the American Revolution. Many of the buildings. A few landmarks that were destroyed for various reasons—fire, storms, collapse—were rebuilt in the 19th century, but it's undeniable that the neighbourhood feels old down to the core. It's a hilly area, the terrain sloping down towards the harbour, with alleyways and side streets letting curious wanderers climb stairs and hills to explore the gems of old Easthaven.

Easthaven Harbor
The harbour is the oldest part of Easthaven. The previously bustling trading port is now primarily a tourist attraction, as Boston took over the lion's share of the shipping industry in the early 20th century. The harbor still looks grand, built up during the 19th century when the city betted big money on incoming trade. The modern-day dock hides the old one's ruins only partially, with parts of the old docks having flooded in the early 19th century. The remnants of the old harbor are submerged, and on days with clear water and bright sun, you can see the crumbling and mollusc encrusted 18th-century buildings on the seafloor. There's a rumour that one of the old subway lines lead straight into the water under the harbour, but no one knows for sure.

USS Seaglass
Anchored by the docks is the USS Seaglass, a replica of a sloop-of-war from the 1700s. The ship used to be a common sight in the harbour before sinking in a naval battle, but the reproduction brought it back to the local community. It's an exciting tourist spot not far off from Bruant Hall; its deck filled with curious tourists and those with a particular interest in warships and sailing. It also doubles as a pop-up restaurant and bar in the summer months, serving refreshments and good food whenever the weather permits.

Bruant Hall
Bruant Hall was built at the start of the 19th century by a French architect. It was the centre of trade for the growing city until business dried up. The city converted it into a marketplace hall and small museum reminding Easthavenites of their sea trading heritage. Around Bruant Hall, there are tour guide booths, and the pavement gets clogged up by tourists looking at the buskers, holding up foot traffic. Behind Bruant Hall, you can find Vauxhall Market, a modern building emulating the architecture of the older hall but filled with various street food vendors for anyone willing to risk the crush. They claim New England's best clam chowder calls Vauxhall Market home, but that's up for debate.

Balmoral Street
A thriving neighbourhood in Old Town, Balmoral Street is where Easthaven's Asian expatriate and immigrant community have called home over the centuries. Established early on in Easthaven's status as a city, the Asian immigrants who settled along Balmoral went to shape a community to protect their own and keep their culture thriving even away from the homeland. The Balmoral of modern-day Easthaven is a world tour of Asian culture and cuisine, with its unique Easthaven twist.

Honey & Ivy
The Honey & Ivy Noodle Bar is a stylish two-story establishment that straddles the line between hole-in-the-w, near the bridge into Old Town proper. It's not well-known, but it's a favourite among regulars for its clean atmosphere, a dining area open to the breeze off the harbour, and a wide variety of Asian dishes, from pho to dumplings. While the food is good, the restaurant is actually the HQ for the Abaca Chain, an underground information brokering ring. The second floor of the restaurant is the VIP lounge, available only by password or invitation. Touted as neutral ground for both the mundane and the supernatural, this is where the restaurant really makes its money.
Owner: Lin Nari

Old Town Creamery
An old familiar favourite in the city, Old Town Creamery has been there seemingly forever. Still, it's changed hands several times, and the selection is constantly changing. It serves exciting ice cream flavours and gelato, various cones, and even milkshakes for anyone who prefers to drink their ice cream. When business is slow during the winter, they offer warmer fare, and delicious pies topped with their made-from-scratch ice cream.

Aston Public Library
The APL is said to have always been in Easthaven, even before it was a city, established by the city's founders when it was a mere colony and named after them. However, the building standing proud in Old Town's centre dates back to the mid-1800s. It's a big, stately building, built on higher ground than the rest of Old Town, making it a looming presence. The architecture is all columns and marble, with stone statues of lions flanking the grand front doors. Inside, the green and white marble floors made sure your footsteps echo as you make your way up the double staircase or down into the basement archives. Rumour says the decorative mosaic in the atrium's centre marks where the Easthaven founders were buried. Still, the librarians know for sure that beneath the library, if you wander far enough beyond the beaten path, you can find the catacombs. At first, it looks mid-19th century as the rest of the building, but the deeper you go, the older and more dangerous the tunnels become.

The Commons
The Easthaven Commons, normally just referred to as the Commons, is the patch of land the original colony used to graze their cattle and other livestock. Today, it's a well maintained park, with it's flat, mowed lawns, carefully maintained copses of trees, and a little duck pond in the middle that they freeze in the winter to serve as a small ice rink. Sculptures and benches are scattered all around, making it a good spot to relax if the weather allows.

Baxendale College
Baxendale, like most of Old Town, boasts some impressive history. It's an old university with an outstanding record and marks itself as exclusive to those intelligent enough to get in. With the motto Disce aut Discede, 'Learn or leave,' that sentiment is made clear. Of course, if your wallet is deep enough, you've got a good chance. It's not all the kids of wealthy alumni, though, as Baxendale has a nationally renowned scholarship programme that ensures that the student body isn't quite as insufferable as it could be. The university has four main buildings, Fallow Hall, Baxendale Hall, Ayers Hall, and Carlyle Hall. The whole area is walled off with fanciful wrought iron fencing, protecting the lush garden that surrounds the university. Different faculties call the halls home, ranging from STEM to the humanities, but they say Fallow Hall has seen plenty of dark rituals in the basement if you believe that sort of thing.

Lethe Hostel
The Lethe Hostel is a well-kept secret among the supernaturals. It functions as a hostel, so you get the odd mundane person staying for a spell. It's a nice place, using a series of refurbished old townhouses to provide housing for their guests, with a large dining hall and kitchen offering them a spot to make meals, with the caretakers laying out a simple spread for breakfast. Often, the Exchange detectives put supernaturals in a tough place at the hostel, footing the bill and making sure they recover and get back on their feet.

Barbarous Nightclub
Between the harbour's industrial area and the tourist traps lies Barbarous. By day, the exterior is an unassuming brick building that looks like, at one point, it was an old warehouse, refurbished and well-maintained. By night, it's a party hub; their neon sign lit up with flames and thudding music that shakes your entire body. It's the 'it' place to be if you're into the party scene, but it's not all fun and games. There's a thriving drug market, so be careful with your drinks.

Old Town Subway
The Old Town subway lines are generally well-maintained, if still old and creaky. The lines that have been closed down are less maintained and essentially go ignored. Brave souls can find their way onto the abandoned lines if they're careful enough, but the general wisdom in Easthaven is not to wander too far, especially in Old Town. One abandoned line goes straight into the harbour, partially submerged by all accounts, and the closer you get to the docks, the more it starts playing tricks on your mind. Reports of ethereal singing echoing through the tunnels are the most common stories from the abandoned lines closer to the harbour.